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Nitrogen

Discussion board (posts 161-180)

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E-mail address Jesse - 11/20/2008 3:54:58 PM

how did nitrogen get it's name

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crystal - 11/13/2008 2:21:03 AM

  E-mail address viro - 4/23/2008 4:55:48 PM
  what is the family for Nitrogen?

pnictogen

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E-mail address aimee - 11/7/2008 6:11:58 AM

how was nitrogen discovered?

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E-mail address aimee - 11/7/2008 6:11:08 AM

how did nitrogen get it's name

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ashley - 10/21/2008 7:27:26 PM

how was nitrogen discovered

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E-mail address brittany - 10/17/2008 2:47:26 PM

What is nitrogen?

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E-mail address quae - 9/19/2008 2:47:13 AM

What type of element is nitrogen?

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E-mail address micHellE cZkiereeNa - 9/18/2008 12:40:09 PM

what's the characteristics of the Nitrogen Family in the periodic table?

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Drew - 9/10/2008 4:21:14 AM

nitrogen's name comes from nitrogenium, a combination of words of latin and greek that means "native soda forming"

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saraj - 9/4/2008 12:29:44 AM

what is nitrogens family name?

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E-mail address cassie - 7/22/2008 3:56:21 AM

how did nitrogen get its name?

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E-mail address nishantha - 6/9/2008 8:43:18 AM

need to know basic properties of nitrogen element.

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E-mail address lilnickruffin@yahoo.com - 5/16/2008 4:06:31 AM

what family is nitrogen in?

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E-mail address mak warder - 5/6/2008 7:16:32 PM

how was nitrogen discovered?

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E-mail address none - 5/6/2008 7:11:32 PM

  E-mail address Perneicia - 3/20/2008 4:03:53 PM
  How did nitrogen get its name?

Nitrogen (Latin nitrogenium, where nitrum (from Greek nitron) means "saltpetre" (see niter), and genes means "forming") is formally considered to have been discovered by Daniel Rutherford in 1772, who called it noxious air or fixed air. That there was a fraction of air that did not support combustion was well known to the late 18th century chemist. Nitrogen was also studied at about the same time by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, Henry Cavendish, and Joseph Priestley, who referred to it as burnt air or phlogisticated air. Nitrogen gas was inert enough that Antoine Lavoisier referred to it as azote, from the Greek word ?????? meaning "lifeless". Animals died in it, and it was the principal component of air in which animals had suffocated and flames had burned to extinction. This term has become the French word for "nitrogen" and later spread out to many other languages.

Argon was discovered when it was noticed that nitrogen from air is not identical to nitrogen from chemical reactions.

Compounds of nitrogen were known in the Middle Ages. The alchemists knew nitric acid as aqua fortis (strong water). The mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids was known as aqua regia (royal water), celebrated for its ability to dissolve gold (the king of metals). The earliest industrial and agricultural applications of nitrogen compounds involved uses in the form of saltpeter (sodium- or potassium nitrate), notably in gunpowder, and much later, as fertilizer,

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E-mail address viro - 4/23/2008 4:55:48 PM

what is the family for Nitrogen?

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E-mail address Kayte - 4/12/2008 4:48:23 PM

  E-mail address Perneicia - 3/20/2008 4:03:53 PM
  How did nitrogen get its name?

Nitrogen was named by Jean Antoine Chaptal and was derived from two greek words (which words they are, I am not sure)

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E-mail address Anna - 3/21/2008 12:08:44 AM

hi i need to know some questions on Nitrogen for an assignment.

1.Where do humans normally find Nitrogen?
2.how do they process Nitrogen to purify it for use from natural state?
3.what country is nitrogens biggest producer?
4.what do humans make with Nitrogen?
5.is Nitrogen poisonous to plants, animals or humans?

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E-mail address Perneicia - 3/20/2008 4:03:53 PM

How did nitrogen get its name?

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E-mail address vanessa - 3/6/2008 3:16:45 AM

where did nitrogen come from?

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