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Tin

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E-mail address dakota - 10/17/2013 2:47:04 PM

whats a good slogan

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E-mail address india - 1/20/2011 3:58:09 AM

I NEED A BOARD MODEL FOR THE ELEMENT TIN?

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E-mail address Dwight - 11/5/2010 4:02:31 AM

  E-mail address samantha - 12/14/2007 8:48:07 PM
  i need a slogan for tin(sn)

What were some of the slogans that you got because I need one for my science project. Thank you in advance

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unkown - 4/27/2010 9:12:20 PM

  E-mail address SuNsHiNe - 11/27/2004 9:40:48 PM
  i think if u go to www.webelements.com it should help a lil bit no worries good luck!

atomic mass 55.845 metal atomic radious 104.5 and it is a poor metal

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E-mail address Luckie - 12/11/2009 2:30:51 PM

i need help with my project about slogan and element

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E-mail address Romeo Montegue - 11/30/2009 7:51:55 PM

I need help understanding why tin has the name tin. If you could please help me that would be GREAT! Please RSVP thank you!

Romeo Montegue

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E-mail address DAMBER DAHAL - 10/31/2009 9:42:26 PM

i need a slogan involving tin for chemistry project.

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E-mail address Kathi - 2/10/2009 12:39:13 AM

  E-mail address Kristi - 10/12/2008 10:28:46 PM
  I need a slogan for the element tin(Sn).

You tin do it.

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Alanna - 1/28/2009 1:27:30 AM

  E-mail address someone from somewhere - 11/23/2008 8:21:16 PM
  Can you guys help me? how did tin get its name?

4rm Saxon Anglo in Latin, stannum.

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Alanna - 1/28/2009 1:25:44 AM

Does any1 noe a slogan 4 tin(Sn) bcuz it's 4 my science project?

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E-mail address someone from somewhere - 11/23/2008 8:21:16 PM

Can you guys help me? how did tin get its name?

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E-mail address gunnar - 10/28/2008 6:42:37 PM

  E-mail address steffi - 3/16/2008 7:29:14 PM
  how much does tin(Sn) cost?

the cost of tin is $4.00 for 1 lb.

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E-mail address maria - 10/24/2008 3:31:37 PM

what is a slogan for tin?

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E-mail address Kristi - 10/12/2008 10:28:46 PM

I need a slogan for the element tin(Sn).

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E-mail address Danielle - 9/19/2008 7:18:10 PM

I need a good slogan for the element lead for my project due on September 24, 2008

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E-mail address steffi - 3/16/2008 7:29:14 PM

how much does tin(Sn) cost?

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E-mail address Colleen Steele - 12/20/2007 8:04:46 PM

I need help coming up with properties of stannous hydroxide... any ideas?

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E-mail address samantha - 12/14/2007 8:48:07 PM

i need a slogan for tin(sn)

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anonymous - 12/11/2007 3:12:51 AM

I need help in making a good slogan for tin and it's half of my grade please help me! I'd really appreciate it!

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E-mail address shareka weatherall - 11/8/2007 4:14:55 AM

i need help top create a good slogan. i hope you can help me make a good one. thanks really appreciate

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E-mail address Sarah - 10/3/2007 10:20:53 PM

I need a good slogan for the element Tin

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 12:01:12 PM

theirs a International Tin Council for more infomation

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 12:00:13 PM

Elemental tin is an essential nutrient, needed in very small amounts. The small amount of tin that is found in canned foods is not harmful to humans.[citations needed]

Certain organic tin compounds, organotin, such as triorganotins (see tributyltin oxide) are toxic and are used as industrial fungicides and bactericides.

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 11:59:57 AM

For discussion of Stannate compounds (SnO32-) see Stannate. For Stannite (SnO2-) see Stannite. See also Stannous hydroxide (Sn(OH)2), Stannic acid (Stannic Hydroxide - Sn(OH)4), Tin dioxide (Stannic Oxide - SnO2), Tin(II) oxide (Stannous Oxide - SnO), Tin(II) chloride (SnCl2), Tin(IV) chloride (SnCl4)

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 11:59:44 AM

Tin is the element with the greatest number of stable isotopes (ten), which is probably related to the fact that 50 is a "magic number" of protons. 28 additional unstable isotopes are known, including the "doubly magic" tin-100 (100Sn) (discovered in 1994)[4].

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 11:59:23 AM

In 2005, China was the largest producer of tin, with at least one-third of the world's share, closely followed by Indonesia and South America, reports the British Geological Survey.

Tin is produced by reducing the ore with coal in a reverberatory furnace. This metal is a relatively scarce element with an abundance in the Earth's crust of about 2 ppm, compared with 94 ppm for zinc, 63 ppm for copper, and 12 ppm for lead. Most of the world's tin is produced from placer deposits. The only mineral of commercial importance as a source of tin is cassiterite (SnO2), although small quantities of tin are recovered from complex sulfides such as stannite, cylindrite, franckeite, canfieldite, and teallite. Secondary, or scrap, tin is also an important source of the metal.

Tasmania hosts some deposits of historical importance

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 11:58:56 AM

Tin (Old English: tin, Old Latin: plumbum candidum, Old German: tsin, Late Latin: stannum) is one of the earliest metals known and was used as a component of bronze from antiquity. Because of its hardening effect on copper, tin was used in bronze implements as early as 3,500 BC. Tin mining is believed to have started in Cornwall and Devon (esp. Dartmoor) in Classical times, and a thriving tin trade developed with the civilizations of the Mediterranean[2][3]. However the lone metal was not used until about 600 BC. The last Cornish Tin Mine, at South Crofty near Camborne closed in 1998 bringing 4,000 years of mining in Cornwall to an end.

The word "tin" has cognates in many Germanic and Celtic languages. The American Heritage Dictionary speculates that the word was borrowed from a pre-Indo-European language. The later name "stannum" and its Romance derivatures come from the lead-silver alloy of the same name for the finding of the latter in ores; the former "stagnum" was the word for a stale pool or puddle.

In modern times, the word "tin" is often improperly used as a generic phrase for any silvery metal that comes in sheets. Most everyday materials that are commonly called "tin", such as aluminum foil, beverage cans, corrugated building sheathing and tin cans, are actually made of steel or aluminum, although tin cans (tinned cans) do contain a thin coating of tin to inhibit rust. Likewise, so-called "tin toys" are usually made of steel, and may or may not have a coating of tin to inhibit rust.

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E-mail address turn off the lights!!! - 8/6/2007 11:57:35 AM

Tin is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Sn (Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50. This silvery, malleable poor metal that is not easily oxidized in air and resists corrosion is found in many alloys and is used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion. Tin is obtained chiefly from the mineral cassiterite, where it occurs as an oxide. It is the classic alloying metal to make bronze.

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E-mail address Rochelle Grant - 12/2/2006 10:30:34 PM

How much does pure Tin (Sn)cost

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E-mail address karabo - 10/4/2006 3:46:09 PM

i am doing research on tin please tell me the physical properties and the reactions of tin.

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E-mail address Rachell - 2/4/2005 10:11:08 PM

I need pictures on tin please help me!!!I'ts my school project and is worth half my final grade!!!

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E-mail address SuNsHiNe - 11/27/2004 9:40:48 PM

  E-mail address jen distel - 11/28/2000 4:19:18 PM
  I'm doing a report on tin tell me anything i need to know!

i think if u go to www.webelements.com it should help a lil bit no worries good luck!

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E-mail address SuNsHiNe - 11/27/2004 9:40:06 PM

  Rachel - 9/29/2004 12:24:26 AM
  I'm a doing a report on Tin can you please tell me anything I would need to know. Thank you

go to webelements.com

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Rachel - 9/29/2004 12:24:26 AM

I'm a doing a report on Tin can you please tell me anything I would need to know. Thank you

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E-mail address sharna - 11/17/2003 8:10:57 PM

what is tin extraction

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Bruce Meier - 6/7/2002 9:15:04 PM

Where are there pictures on the Internet of compounds of elements

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E-mail address Jess - 4/4/2001 8:15:13 PM

  E-mail address jen distel - 11/28/2000 4:19:18 PM
  I'm doing a report on tin tell me anything i need to know!

Can you send me anyhting you got about tin?? If you can I need it by 4/4/01

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E-mail address jen distel - 11/28/2000 4:19:18 PM

I'm doing a report on tin tell me anything i need to know!

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