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Calcium

Discussion board (posts 201-220)

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vicky - 3/11/2006 3:08:51 PM

  E-mail address Desperate d*&k - 3/2/2006 9:23:10 AM
  I need to know where Calcium was discovered and it's family name

it comes from the alkali family and is an earth metal

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vicky - 3/11/2006 3:07:52 PM

  E-mail address martine - 1/4/2006 11:11:24 PM
  hi i need to no the melting point and freezing point of calcium can you help?

boiling point - 1757c
melting poit - 1112c

does that answer your question? hope it does

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E-mail address elizabeth - 3/10/2006 12:42:38 AM

HELP!!!!
I am doing a project and I need to know the uses of calcium and an AMAZING, interesting fact!!!! please help me!

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E-mail address Desperate d*&k - 3/2/2006 9:23:10 AM

I need to know where Calcium was discovered and it's family name

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katie - 2/28/2006 11:25:29 AM

does milk contain calcium calcium as a compound or an element?

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elen - 2/26/2006 6:05:47 PM

i need to know how much calcium costs

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E-mail address Tysha - 2/24/2006 3:06:52 PM

where and when was calcium discovered?!

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anna - 2/17/2006 8:54:13 PM

when and were was calcium discover

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newb - 2/9/2006 2:02:35 AM

  E-mail address Ashira - 2/8/2006 2:55:59 PM
  what are the valence electrons in calcium?

It's an alkaline earth so all of them have 2 valence electrons. I'm doing a calcium project too.

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E-mail address Ashira - 2/8/2006 2:55:59 PM

what are the valence electrons in calcium?

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anonymous - 2/1/2006 8:06:00 PM

  E-mail address Marissa - 2/7/2005 11:22:25 PM
  Duh! that is such an easy one! here is how you find it. Take the atomic mass which is the number below the chemical sign. in this case the number is 40.03. lets just round that to 40. then you subtract the atomic number from that so you do 40-20 and get 20 it is like super easy!

its 20 neutrons

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drew - 1/31/2006 6:34:10 AM

my project is due tomarrow what other info do I need

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E-mail address Ashlee - 1/27/2006 11:48:40 PM

  molly - 1/20/2006 8:58:58 PM
  calcium is a soft element usually found in the earths crust found usually in the solid state in room temperature

usually found in a soild shape at room temp

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kady - 1/26/2006 4:05:19 PM

where was calcuim discovered??? i need to know by 10:33

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molly - 1/20/2006 8:58:58 PM

  E-mail address Brett - 1/20/2006 12:08:38 AM
  does anyone know what calcium phase it is in when at room temperature. this due monday and i need this question done

calcium is a soft element usually found in the earths crust found usually in the solid state in room temperature

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molly - 1/20/2006 8:56:53 PM

this is pretty much the coolest webcite ever!!i just love calcium well i got to go work on a chemistry project of CALCIUM!! mua hahaha ta ta luv ya much

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E-mail address Brett - 1/20/2006 12:08:38 AM

does anyone know what calcium phase it is in when at room temperature. this due monday and i need this question done

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E-mail address Brett - 1/19/2006 11:56:16 PM

  E-mail address brittany lee - 5/18/2004 4:35:43 PM
  need information about curuim.thanks send it to my email.

discovered and isolated in England in 1808 by Sir Humphrey Davy. common in minerals like chalk, limestone, and marble. melting point: 1112.2k. boiling point: 1767k. atomic number:20 chemical symbol: Ca

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E-mail address Brett - 1/19/2006 11:50:59 PM

  E-mail address Adrienne - 12/1/2001 8:37:29 PM
  I have a quick question for anyone...could you please email me back if you know the answer to this.....What is calcium found in and what is it used for? I need to know this for school...I can't thank you enough for answering it...thanks again

calcium is found in minerals like chalk, limestone, and marble. dont know what its used for so i cant help you out there.

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britney - 1/19/2006 2:43:34 AM

a go to www.chemicool.com

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